Technically I was born in a horse trough. Filled with water, in my grandparent’s Broad Beach home in Malibu. Technically my mother was by herself, because who really needs doctors for these trivial types of things.

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My grandfather, Gor and some guy named Frank (Sinatra)

My paternal grandfather, composer/conductor/arranger Gordon Jenkins had bought this home in the late 40s to get away from the crowds in LA. A few years later, a family moved in down the street. My mother’s father, Bill Ulyate, was a saxophonist/studio musician/band leader at Disneyland (Carnation Plaza), and the two musicians held a mutual respect for each other. Years later, Bill’s youngest daughter and Gor’s youngest son became my parents, the boy and girl next door.

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Grandpa Bill on sax and Elvis on drums

When I was 8, after moving to the mountains and many run ins with horses and tepees and goats I began taking harp lessons. My sister played as well, and every week on Friday for 8 years, my mom drove us nearly 100 miles each way to my teacher’s house and back.

My love for traditional music took me all the way to Glasgow Scotland (where I knew a grand totally of absolutely no one) on an unconditional acceptance to the RSAMD (now RCS) in Scottish harp and Gaelic song. 3 years there and a final year studying Gaelic at the quaintest college in the world (Sabhal Mor Ostaig on the Isle of Skye) I returned home a pasty shade of grey and dying for sunshine and vitamin D.

I built a very small house on a trailer during 2011-12 and moved myself up to the Bay Area for what I find to be the happy medium between Scotland’s soggy unpredictably and LA’s burning fire of death.

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My wee house, Little Yellow

Now I write music, swim in the ocean, and make all my clothes, jewelry, and pretty much everything on me except for my boots. Which I will one day try, but I’ve a feeling it’s going to be pretty complicated. I blog at http://www.littleyellowdoor.wordpress.com.

Interesting fact: my grandfather, Gordon Jenkins, wrote the song  ‘Crescent City Blues’ which Johnny Cash shamelessly ripped off for his well known song ‘Folsom Prison Blues’.

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